Elections

Final_EDITABLE_ELECTIONS_POSTER_A4_2020

Press release for local elections and Make A Change

Notice of Election – Parish

 

Thursday 5th May 2022

MAKE A CHANGE BECOME A COUNCILLOR
The National Association of Local Councils (NALC) is calling on all community
heroes to step up and become a local (parish and town) councillor at the 2021
elections.
What do councillors do?
Local councillors are the champions of their community who invest time in local
projects and issues to the benefit of residents and the neighbourhood. Councillors
attend to local needs of residents, local groups and businesses, make decisions on
local services, collaborate with district and borough councils to adhere to local
needs, and progress vital projects to invest in the future of the community.
What do councils do?
Councils lead on community services such as allotments, footpaths, public seating
and litter bins, but also larger projects such as the running of local transport,
leisure services, youth services and climate change initiatives. These activities are
funded by a local tax, called a precept which is determined by the council.
How long does it take?
NALC’s Local Councillor Census Survey found that councillors put aside, on
average, three hours a week for council work. Council work often includes
attending meetings, engaging with residents and speaking to local groups and
bodies on behalf of the council.
Can I stand for election?
You must be:
• A British citizen, or a citizen of the Commonwealth, or the European Union
• 18 years of age or older
• Live in an area that is served by a local council
How can I get involved?
Contact your local council or visit www.nalc.gov.uk/elections to find out more

FAQ’s

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ON LOCAL COUNCIL
ELECTIONS
Why would I want to be a councillor?
Local (parish and town) councillors are passionate about their communities and
seek to make a change to help improve the lives of their residents. Local councils
run numerous services, depending on their size. These include introducing solar
panels, setting up dementia-friendly groups, organising community buses,
creating neighbourhood plans, implementing suitable housing, establishing youth
projects, managing allotments and open spaces, maintaining footpaths, public
seating and litter bins.
Becoming a councillor is a rewarding experience. A councillor’s role can include
responsibilities such as developing strategies and plans for their community,
helping with problems and ideas, representing the community, working with other
local community groups, decision making and reviewing decisions and talking to
the community about their needs and council decisions.
How do I become a councillor?
There are six simple steps to becoming a councillor:
1. Check for elections in your area by emailing your elections officer. Submit
your nomination to the returning officer — find out more about
the process and the criteria
2. Wait for your nomination to be accepted
3. Your nomination is made public by the principal authority
4. Start your elections campaign
5. Polling day
Am I eligible to stand for election?
You must be:
• A British citizen or a citizen of the Commonwealth, or the European Union
• 18 years of age or older
• Live in an area that is served by a local council
What do councillors do?
Local councillors have three main areas of work:
1. Decision-making: through attending meetings and committees with other
elected members, councillors decide which activities to support, where
money should be spent, what services should be delivered and what
policies should be implemented.
2. Monitoring: councillors make sure that their decisions lead to efficient and
effective services by keeping an eye on how well things are working.
3. Getting involved locally: as local representatives, councillors have
responsibilities towards their constituents and local organisations. These
responsibilities often depend on what the councillor wants to achieve and
how much time is available. The day-to-day work of a councillor may
include:
• going to meetings of local organisations and community groups
• going to meetings of bodies that affect the wider community, such as
the police, the Highways Authority, schools and colleges
• taking up issues on behalf of members of the public, such as making
representations to the principal authority
• running surgery for residents to bring up issues
• meeting with individual residents in their own homes
What do local councils do?
Your local council has overall responsibility for the wellbeing of your local
community. Their work falls into three main categories:
1. Delivery of services including allotments, leisure facilities, bus shelters, litter
bins, car parks, local illuminations, community centres, parks and open
spaces, public toilets, street lighting, and festivals and celebrations.
2. Improve the quality of life through local housing and infrastructure through
neighbourhood plans, promoting dementia-friendly communities, tackling
loneliness, acting as community hubs, and funding cut community projects
and vital services.
3. Give communities a voice to the local police and health services, on
planning matters with principal authorities and developers, and to
parliamentarians and government.
What training and support is there?
Councillors can receive training and support via their county association, who are
the representative bodies for local councils in their area.
What is the time commitment?
NALC’s Local Councillor Census Survey found that councillors put aside, on
average, three hours a week for council work. Council work often includes
attending meetings, engaging with residents and speaking to local groups and
bodies on behalf of the council.
For more information, please get in touch with policycomms@nalc.gov.uk